Aug 162013
 

Florida study shows motorists cause motorcycle accidents

Study Shows Motorists Cause Motorcycle Accidents

August 16, 2013 /24-7PressRelease/ — In the last few years, motorcycles have become a popular mode of transportation around Orlando and it is common to see these two-wheeled vehicles on the highways and neighborhood lanes around the city.However, motorists often view motorcyclists as a nuisance and fail to give them the respect and space they need. When this happens, usually motorists cause motorcycle accidents more often than not.

In 2010, the Florida Traffic Crash Statistics Report revealed that there were over 8,000 crashes involving motorcycles around the state that year. Over 7,400 injuries were sustained by motorcyclists, 376 cyclists were killed and 767 passengers on motorcycles died.
Motorists not paying attention
According to the Sun Sentinel, motorists feel that motorcyclists are reckless and motorcyclists feel that motorists aren’t paying attention, thereby colliding with motorcycles.
A study conducted by the University of South Florida’s Center for Urban Transportation Research shows that motorcyclists have a point. The study, which examined motorcycle accidents during a period of ten years, showed that drivers often fail to yield the right of way to motorcycles and driver distraction appears to be a major factor.
While there are many motorcyclists that cause their own accidents, motorists are responsible for the majority of crashes. In fact, the study reveals that motorists are found at fault for 60 percent of collisions involving cars and motorcycles.
Sharing the road
It is important for motorists to understand that motorcycles have a place on Orlando’s roads and building an awareness of the presence of motorcycles can be an effective way to reduce the number of bikers who suffer serious injuries each year.
Some of the things that drivers should be aware of include:
  • Motorcycles are smaller in size and therefore can be difficult to see – drivers should be aware of this around other vehicles, signs and buildings.
  • Always look twice before turning left or merging into traffic.
  • Avoid distractions in the vehicle such as a cell phone or food, which may prevent a driver from seeing a motorcycle.
  • Drivers should always alert motorcycles to their intention by using turn signals.
  • Motorcycles should always be given their own lane and space. Motorcycles move and operate in a different manner than cars do.
  • Motorists should educate themselves on these differences so that they understand why motorcyclists behave the way they do.

Seeking compensation

When a motorcyclist is involved in an accident with another vehicle, their risk of being severely injured or killed is great. This is not surprising since they only have their helmet and protective clothing to shield them from harm. As such, motorcyclists may lose income and incur thousands of dollars in medical debt.

If you have been injured by a motorist in a motorcycle accident, you should speak with a qualified and experienced attorney to understand what your legal rights are.

Read more: http://www.digitaljournal.com/pr/1417648#ixzz2cC6MwTkg

 

HDhistory Note: Over the past several years many similar studies have surfaced all pointing to the majority of motorcycle accidents being caused by motorists not giving due care and attention to their surroundings and traffic. For decades insurance companies have raked in profits by applying blanket rates to motorcycles citing the high number of accidents and insurance paid out. The premiums were applied to motorcyclists regardless of who was at fault which in my mind is grounds for a class action DISCRIMINATION suit. Common sense would point out that the victim is paying the piper not the offender. Because motorcyclists are the minority in the broad spectrum of vehicular insurance, it was easy for insurance companies to cover their losses by hiking all motorcycle rates because the public mentality is such that “motorcycles are inherently dangerous and should be penalized as such”.  Funny, but riding a bicycle is just as dangerous because of collisions with motorists. Are bicycles inherently dangerous?

The motoring public at large are woefully lacking in defensive driving skills in vehicles that easily give them the ability to drive far beyond their skill level. Over the years driving distractions have grown too with the advent of so many electronic gizmos and doo-dads. GPS, cell phones, dvd players, LED road side advertising so bright to get your attention and give you that sales pitch etc etc. It takes skill to ride a motorcycle because the deck is already stacked against us. But in any side by side test a motorcyclist vs a motorist, the motorcyclist will come out ahead hands down in defensive driving and predicting traffic over the average car/truck driver. Insurance companies need to see that by applying minimal premium raises to all parties and heavier rate coverage to motorists found to be the majority of fault in a car/motorcycle accident along with mandatory defensive driving classes. Our motorists need better driving skills, and insurance companies are targeting the wrong demographic. Insurance ESPECIALLY government insurance which by law cannot discriminate needs to be applied fairly for anyone to have faith in the system. We either lobby to have government intervene on our behalf for private insurance companies, or we lobby government insurance to apply all things fairly lest they be taken to task over discrimination. In 3rd world countries motorcycles are the only mode of transportation that’s accessible to those who can afford it, with autos/trucks being unattainable. If you’ve ever seen Youtube video of rush hour in vietnam you’ll see what cooperative and attentive inter-vehicular traffic is like with people paying crucial attention to what they’re doing. In the western world motorcycle riding is becoming the sport of kings with the money grab rates the insurance companies charge. Forget that you can buy a motorcycle cheap…can you afford to insure it?

~ Hook for HDhistory